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. the unified school district case no. 80862 the board of education gives the authority of the district to pay up to the stipulated amount. wait a minute this is the vote total can't be correct and i also did not vote on that item you need to look at the vote totals again. so we may need to read this anti. can we clarify that before the at the end of this meeting. in the existing litigation meeting vs. the unified school district san francisco supreme court the board of education approved by the a vote of 5 yeses and settlement prudent to the district will resend a educational benefit allow the employee to retroactively resign and pay the employee the sum of 5 hundreds as a petition for a writ of men and women democrat and all possible claims against the district will be dropped. in arbitration matters and case and u.s. grievance number case no. ar b12 dash 2 r-7 the board of education approvals a supplement prudent to which the district will make 62 bargaining unit members. cumulative totally $500 plus in exchange for a dismissal claims relatively to the 2012 low implementation. do we have th
with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obligations and starting with the adults and i go back to the adults because the adults really have to tow the line here. they really have to walk the talk. i cannot tell you how often i of involved in large mentoring efforts and now in two different places, in l.a. and arizona. i cannot tell you how often the teachers are the ones that set the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and
privatized. all of the higher education is being privatized. all through the uc system. how do you run a modern state with tax cuts? we resort to desperate, back last november, we were asked to vote to make four indian casinos in san diego county pony up money. i thought this was a joke. they voted to do it. now, the governor proposes to borrow against future revenues. how did they deal with these social problems when the economic problems were far worse than what we can imagine today? this is from larry halprin's. and it has these quotes from roosevelt on the wall. he said in one of his talks to the people, "the test is not whether we have more, it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little". it's a different philosophy than that which we have become used to. what i am going to show you is a lost civilization. it's a strange place. and yet, it becomes oddly familiar after a while because we built it and use it every day without knowing it. it has been buried. the living new deal project is like an archaeological dig. we are going after the new deal in california, but h
throughout the country. education was the gateway. access to education would provide a better future for the children. today that belief remains the same. education is a pathway for future success. however access to high quality education still remains an illusions to many children. too many african american and other people of color remain segregated in other schools and determined desperate and in later life. a huge gap in problems across the country. add to that the concept of unconscious bias, low expectations and high expulsion and suspension rates and it's so many reasons why they fall below the bar. even in san francisco where we have the highest performing schools we have the highest achievement gap among african american and latino students. we need to invest more in the future of our young people. in 1964, dr. king said, the richest nation on earth has never allocated sufficient schools to allocate teachers. we squander funds on highways, on the pursuit of recreation, on the over abundance of over kill arm meant but we pop rise education. even those these words were 50 year
their education to make sure that i could go on to finish high school and to go on to college and those great sacrifices i recognize. we have seen so many great leaders that have come up of the sfaisz sacrifices that parents have made. i want to call out some of the leaders (calling names) great organizations that have made incredible accomplishments lately we passed the due process for all ordinance board of supervisors that's because of the leaders of this community. today, we're honoring future leaders people who are macro great accomplishments in their education i want to call them up one-on-one on the stage. first (calling names) (clapping) he's a 12th grader he is was an stent day participate at marshall and it's now a part of the college came back program. he volunteered when it left marshall as a fifth grader he's currently a senior and continues to support marshall as a college bound ambassador. congratulations (clapping) okay. next i would call up an eight grader she demonstrates a willingness to help this is very rare to see she's a social leader. congratulations (clapping) next u
was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introducti
their curious about it they can prototype it and there's a lot of educates out there you don't have to have moifldz dollars so all the tools to make that possible is at the core of what the maker movement is for me. so with respect to our company when i'm talking to the fcc about getting our licenses to communities with satellites in space we're a solid company not like a maker company but internally we're occurring we're full of engineers and scientists that have tools at the their disposal. so i think we would self-identify internally as markers. >> beware i think he's posed to answer this so chris has the title for his next book (laughter). >> the nature come punctuation. >> he has a book and if the employees know what's good for them it's next door. other questions from the audience, please. there's a microphone right there >> so we kind of all noticed how america communes 25 percent of the workforce whatever. i'm curious how you guys think about the maker movement whatever is effecting the way people consume and what's the introductory of how the maker movement is going and a can i
educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young people, particularly marginalized young people, to take part. >> you menti
a trump card. educational equity is still an unmet promise. bullying of lgbt in schools still needs to be cared for. immigration reform for undocumented workers who are making this country strong. i look forward to working with everyone here tonight to make all of those dreams come true. thank you very much. [ applause ] >> our next awardee is the homeless prenatal program. the homeless prenatal program is honored to present this award on behalf of 500 low income families who have a chance to dream about a better future for their children and determination to make that dream a reality. we accept this award on behalf of it's staff. many of whom are clients through tireless work. we have come a long way from the march on washington and we have a long way left to go. since 1963, a structural injustice remains. the poverty unjustly reflects the poverty and instability of our color. htp is committed to challenging these disparities by providing critical health and social services not only to seek as safety net but also empower families, with affordable housing and education and job train
involved in education. he used to be the police chief. now he is the district attorney, gascon. he had an idea about a junior academy that would take san francisco eans and give them skills to get into the academy. you can make a great living as a police officer. the same notion with the fire department. these are careers you don't normally think about when you are in high school. you often are relegated to a path to go to a four-year university. that is not for everyone. there is an opportunity for everyone to work. that is the main point i am trying to drive home. when we talk about the issues, the one that stands out for me is education, economic and work force of the element, stimulating the local economy. we have the third street merchant corridor and an opportunity to revitalize what i consider to be the main artery of the bayview district, of the southeast quarter. third street is a pretty long streak. from at&t park, it goes all the way to candlestick park. there is a lot of opportunity. don't squander that. we wanted to be a healthy mix that reflects the cultural history of th
in education and the empowerment through education. there is a certain resistlessness and get out of your comfort zone and explore other things. that's how i got here. the path is not easy it's taken 12 years to get a green card. it limits ones opportunity. first, it will take a long time before the h1 process will allow you to move before jobs and you can't start a business. it took me 9 months to start a business. i was so restless to start something so you take capable individuals who are smart and driven and you can't limit them. the comprehensive immigration reform everybody in this room agrees we have to pass high school immigration. but having being on the spotlight you can't really traffic or switch between companies and now imagine the population that's route rights and i think it is morally not acceptable. and the children thought they had a country but apparently the country doesn't want them. >> alexander your story. >> hello. i'm originally from columbia and i was back in columbus. i was in love with computers but we didn't have enough money. eventually this is 1994 i had ac
transforming our education system as described as struggling in the past with a lot of different barriers and opening up to our effort to involve a larger picture of what our residents and their families really want to do in the great city of san francisco and how do we attract those families to stay here. i go to technology visits every tech tour tuesday and meet with thirty or 40 employees of those companies and many of them know their ipos won't come in like other families they want to be here and work in jobs by the first thing is what are we doing that the schools. that's the birthing sign of viechltd. the best investment is to create a family here because that means you've got fabricate in the way we've treated our schools and the private-public partnering we have. in addition the technology gap that sales force is helping us today with offer $1.7 million in the other person ipads and the tinge goes with it is the training of features tea administrators. that's similar to what auto deck zinc gesture offers. it's the support mechanisms. it's one thing to announce the gift bus it's th
with our efforts to get folks to recycle, it is a great educational tool. since then, we have had 95 professional artists come through. >> how has the program changed over the years? how has the program -- what can the public has an artist engage with? >> for the most part, we worked with metal and wood, what you would expect from a program like ours. over the years, we tried to include artists and all types of mediums. conceptual artists, at installation, photographers, videographers. >> that has really expanded the program out. it is becoming so dynamic right now with your vision of interesting artists in gauging here. why would an artist when to come here? >> mainly, access to the materials. we also give them a lot of support. when they start, it is an empty studio. they go out to the public area and -- we call it the big store. they go out shopping, take the materials that, and get to work. it is kind of like a reprieve, so they can really focus on their body of work. >> when you are talking about recology, do you have the only sculpture garden at the top? >> it is based on work
particularly entrepreneurs. i want to get you to talk about the education and the world of the united states. what kind of impact if the immigration reform didn't happen what impact will it have >> in the short time the visas the h1 petition we're trying to find a replacement for that person in the united states it's difficult to find people with skills so we might enable them to set up their offices and build a team. >> i was going to say if you guys haven't checked out the start up report they've done things around the world. so everywhere the e go system is growing but if we don't fix the immigration issues then the other pavrts parts of the world like brazil and china and venture capita lifts have activity invest in other countries >> if it does happen have you seen the banner - we'll just get real sad. >> mayor lee. i think the recovery will not be fully for everybody. you'll have thirty to 50 thousand people in our city alone maybe 2 and a half million that don't talk about their health and they have to create things underground and that effects health safety and fiscal safety in ou
the country. because the data shared by our u.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do anything about it, 13 million kids will become victims again for another year. some 3 million kids across the country will decide it is better to leave their school grounds than to continue their education. there will be more stupblting of the emotional and educational growth of our kids. all across the bay, whether working here in san francisco or alameda or sonoma or santa clara county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site
been around for about 32 years. we're nonprofit and we do both education and advocacy and on the education end we develop be curriculum and the curriculum is used widely across the country. it's in every state in the country and in canada and 70 countries around the world and programs we're familiar with is second step and i am hearing some nods and we have a -- idea of kind of what kind of things that we do, and i also do advocacy work so i come and speak at meetings like this. i was at the attorney general's meeting in washington state and i would like to congratulate you and especially those in law enforcement in california for the high level of discourse that you have incredibly impressed today by what i have heard and my hats off to you for all the good work you're doing. so i do advocacy and part of that is kind of reaching out to people and bringing the message of social emotional learning not just to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the s
of my question is, i'm also an educator. i get invited to distillery around the world and which draws a lot of attention for our expertise and spirits and i do a lot of education. i'm a national education bar tenders guild. the liquor laws don't allow us to use alcohol in training. the bar tenders schools in california are a joke. it's a cheap industry where hopeful bar tenders are hoping to take a $300-500 course to use colored liquid. if we are expected to do this for educational purposes, i imagine that we have to do the same thing, to go through the legislators to propose that to the public and propose it to the abc. i believe this nightlife summit was create because of problems in the public, there was problems with noise, problems with over drinking, a lot of our laws are based on that. i'm here to propose that we have more responsible training for our bar tenders and servers. the cocktail boom around the country has turned bartenders into a true professional. now that professional bartender's job is in question. >> i'm sure it's around the whole notion of where you can drink a
bringing the film and educating, training professional development largely thriewr our partnership with them and provides that to school districts and classrooms across the country for free, so educators can sign up, and if they agree to do the training and to take it seriously and embed it with the kids and the adults in the community we provide them with oftentimes busing, but often free tickets so they can see the film outside of school and make it an event and that is our project "1 million kids". we're doing it in a big way here in the bay area thanks to the leadership in this community. yep and oakland and all over. it's just awesome and in cleveland and right now we have 13,000 students across the basin in salt lake city are seeing it, and does have impact and the impact is largely i would say it creates a sense of agreement. the biggest thing that bully does or the big service the film has is gives everyone a unified collective science of agreement to which they roll up the sleeves and get busy creating change and has been really exciting. i building we already i belie
the educational system. we are still experiencing digital divide and access and just the one you speak of recently officer when you mention the generations and investigators not engaged with this media and no don't know my book or face space and when you have to look at youth culture. we talk about texting and sexing and omg and i didn't text anything to you. i spoke to and part of the language and how they engage so until we look at the culture of young people and how do we impact today's 20th century media culture we can't make a huge impact in regards to bullying or electronic aggression or whatever name we want to place on it and is affecting the students and i am excited you're addressing this issue and it's a crucial time for this generation and if we don't take serious this conversation today and action tomorrow we will see more and more issues arise. [applause] >> and i'm going to cap it up and i totally agree with that and one of the resources i want you to point is out is the family institute on line and platform for good a couple days ago. anne was there for the launch in
justice and people say "that's san francisco" and we believe that a right to a education is i social justice issue and if you deny that you're denying their civil rights. that's how we feel about being proactive. now there is a line of demarcation happens and we want to be proactive i know jill is looking at me. when the event happens and there is harm that occurs we believe in restorative practices and repairing the harm. we don't believe in kicks kids out of school. that's not a solution. we are an educational institution. we go through this process and the perpetrator understands the damage and make it right to the victim. it's not okay shake hands. it's a whole process. you talk about it and process what is happening and people follow up on that, so we very much believe in this restorative process in san francisco and how do we know? because of the indicators that should be going up are going up and the others are going down. our truancies are down. suspensions are down and students in class is going up. thank you for being here. [applause] >> okay. that's okay. you ju
produce from one to the other, and educating both parties along the way. >> may need a look at the progress of a particular crop or report back, maybe some feedback, to the farmer about how the chefs are using it or what they might be looking for in the near future. >> in many ways, produce express and people like jim mills are the link between 1,300 different restaurants in northern california and produce from all over the golden state. today's visit took us to del rio botanical farm in yolo county, where suzanne peabody ashworth was keen to get restaurants to start trying the fresh fava beans and greens she's growing. >> so we'll take some of these greens into a couple of restaurants this morning and see what the chefs want to do with them. in sacramento, there's been an explosion of restaurants over the past 4 or 5 years in our capital. again, sacramento, california, agriculture, fruits and vegetables--there's a very bice link there and the interest that my customers have in this produce. >> we call at 5:30 in the morning and get the normal order, and then, along about 7:
and the right folks we have been educating. so when you look at the numbers and the pop up most americans support this. and they'll see the benefits in their communities. i've repealed many companies and it requires us to come and see the support at the state and national level what's fueling the education don't for the community. we get real focused on the national community but it's at the state and local level. and even smaller towns across the country. so the messages it is from the state and local level first >> let's hear from our young entrepreneurs. your creating jobs and paying taxes when you hear this from people what you do you say >> i've definitely paid hoof taxes. the short answer is yeah, the silicon valley if that were not true. it would be like the - i know i've spent a lot of time with interesting people from all over the world and their successful people and their passionate about being here and their contributing to the economy >> i like to give the example of football. imagine the 49ers and we're going to be playing with another team but what if it is other team ha
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people, people that have blue- collar jobs. really, it is paramount and centered on education. for young people, making sure, ensuring we are providing them a quality education in public schools. i served as chair on the select committee, a committee between the members of the board of supervisors and members on the school board, coming together to address the challenges. in this particular case, we are talking about education. we are talking about a working- class community, the excelsior, the bayview, all of these different neighborhoods are smaller enclaves. we still see the same kinds of challenges. when the schools begin to perform a stellar academic programs, businesses will continue to relocate because the employees will want to live in san francisco and want kids to be educated here. it is a cyclical and symbiotic creation ship. another challenges that we have the highest unemployment rate in this part of san francisco. san francisco before, the numbers are starting to come down a little bit. we have high rates in the latter part of last year, but it is starting to -- it is start
. the other thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the attitudes don't change. so that is the human
will now move on to item t the closed session action for the meeting the board of education approved the contract for one intifrm principle and one administrator. the board of education approved a minor modification of the schools contract with distribution to redraft the contract to include that modification. in the matter of g l vs. the unified school district case no. 80862 the board of education gives the authority of the district to pay up to the stipulated amount. wait a minute this is the vote total can't be correct and i also did not vote on that item you need to look at the vote totals again. so we may need to read this anti. can we clarify that before the at the end of this meeting. in the existing litigation meeting vs. the unified school district san francisco supreme court
their heads. if people are better educated about these issues they will call the people on the carpet and say wait a minute. i think the mission, if i can give you that, would be to step outside your circle, your work circle and bring this issue to the broader public so they can create a change in the culture and the public's response to these issues that will then enable the politicians and legislators to make the reforms to the finances and the court's etc that really need to happen and one way i think is a good way to do that and i'm talking, i'm a journalist, an advocacy journalist, it's usually said with a sneer but i wear the badge proudly, to reach out to reporter's because of course they do have that soapbox to share these stories with. so reach out to reporter's in your local newspapers, crime reporter's, whoever, and just invite them to spend the day with you. invite them to spend a day looking at just a day in your life as a public defender, a day in the life of you as a parole officer, whatever it is. and it's a tradition journalist use a lot with cops. we do a police ride along.
not ends our lives with violence with education and prospering in our economies in this state >> check her out yeah. >> (speaking spanish.) >> (clapping) and talking about a woman who helped save brave have a stacey. and talking about latinos there was a >> (speaking spanish.) >> all my people there was a study it came out that showed to latinos not only live in the excelsior we live in the south of market and pacific heats and every district in san francisco and thank you, dr. local. but we've got a lot of work to do. we talked about those accomplishments the latinos are making with you right now supervisor campos says we're 200 in which i say. people are getting evicted come and march with us so we can protect the culture that's exemplified here for years not only in the mission but the african culture and chinese town culture and all the cultures in san francisco which are at risk right now. we have a crisis and we've got to stand up. i want to end by saying next thursday at the everett middle school we're going to be presenting a violence control program to end violence and also t
access to workshops. as people are being to innovative in the education spaces putting c and c tools into the hands of younger and young people make them more easily available there needs to be a nature progression and people need to see facilities like tech spop shop more used than a gym basically >> on a serious note i would probably try to focus on education. that's something that's all mentioned now a father of two i'm not a father of anybody yet by that's a serious problem people move out of the cities when they have children. with respect to innovation i would want the space not just for office building but for residential we could unleash our population when we think about how to use our buildings that are vacated and zone in simple a way to be a bit important modern of what the creative people want to do. a lot of people are living and working in similar places and tailors not a difference >> let me be more specific about space. tells us exactly where your located right now where are you likely to move to next? >> i know we have a pipe organize manufacturing factory at the
in that process. >> 18 reasons was started almost four years ago as an educational arm of their work. and we would have dinners and a few classes and we understood there what momentum that people wanted this type of engagement and education in a way that allowed for a more in-depth conversation. we grew and now we offer -- i think we had nine, we have a series where adults learned home cooking and we did a teacher training workshop where san francisco unified public school teachers came and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that
. and also the mayor's advisors of education and family services. please welcome hydro mendez. come on (clapping) thank you allen. i like that the current because there will be more. it's such a delight to be here in our home and thank you four joining us in city hall. i want to thank the neighborhood services we celebrate all our event in san francisco. i wanted to not spend a lot of time why we're here it's so obvious. the richness of our cult and history needs to be celebrated. i'm happy you're here who we are as the filipinos and the richness of our heritage we want to share throughout san francisco and california every day. this isn't just the most it's one of the many months we celebrate. tights high honor to be up here someone who is special to all of us mayor ed lee was sworn in on january 8th as our ferd mayor of the city and county and inform and the first asian american in the history. with this being the second largest population in the united states and the largest population in the state you mayor ed lee have made us proud. nearly 15 percent of the workforce of nearly
want to thank a few words thank you uncle bill and filipinos thank you for the educational empowerment and thank you. i love you all (clapping.) all right. congratulations. now i'd like to take this opportunity please welcome amy khan. (clapping) >> hi, good evening, everybody. so on behalf of supervisor david chiu i have the special privilege of recognizing an incredible leader in the filipino american community tonight and that individual is ms. jerry verify and i'm sure you all know her. so genevieve please come up. she's the executive director of happy free san francisco which is a citywide campaign to make sure that we're the first health care champion for pacific eyeders in the united states. this campaign provides helping testing for ap i's throughout our city. the organization is also provides free health education and workshops about hepatitis b all throughout the city as well speaker so the supervisor couldn't be here tonight but wanted to make sure i give a special shout out his words are thank you rock star. she's been active in serving as the director for the filipinos n
of the discussion. we've got federal, state and local policy makers, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he
the economy on track. mayor lee keeps us focused on keeping san francisco a city that celebs education and health care and the environment for our future generations (clapping) >> (speaking spanish.) >> (clapping). >> thank you. i had no idea what you that but it sounded pretty good. everyone welcome to the city hall our people's hall in san francisco. and i am here to join i in celebrated latino heritage month. i want to thank a number of dignitaries that i know who have worked with me. we have the council general of japan and the mongol council and counsel generalizes representing nick away wag and others countries our friends (clapping) >> i see our colleagues on the board president chiu. thank you david chu for being here (clapping) i might not see them immediately but i know that supervisor john avalos and george will be here shortly. and then i also see jeff our public defenders public defender for being here that you are ladies and gentlemen, we're also very rich with latino leaders in our department and to name some of them on behalf of the whole city people like lou our li
of tablets into the schools and the kids might get the applications. it's incredible part of our education were fast forward not only are those machines and tools exposing people to a new way of manufacturing but we need to make more things and allow the world to do it in a modern way. it's not just having the workshops but exposing them to the 3-d abilities. that manufacturing that ability to manufacture onshore will be introduced right here in san francisco because of this incredible performance. they have a bio printing. what's that. some of the people from my hometown in seattle want to give him a bet on the 479 and seahawks and they want me to shave off my mustache and if i do that i don't expect too because we'll win i have bio printing to help me roar that maybe i've got a tool. the bio printing is going to be an extremely serious work. along with the playful and educational introduction we're on the verge of a huge transportation. just like when the engineers came to my office we're no longer going to use 2 dimensional we're going to help everybody to solve problems in the world. i
their ability to continue with their employment, education or family responsibilities. so the center on criminal justice would advocate for an increased use or implementation of pretrial services at the local level and some on this panel will speak with more detail on that. >> let me ask miss dewint that you are obviously part of the bail association and the president of the organization, you have decades of experience. critics have argued that your association and other associations like it use their influence by way of lobbying to protect the groups financial interest. i'm wondering if you can respond to that and perhaps give us an idea what kind of lobbying your organization does? >> thank you. first of all let me thank jeff and the san francisco public defenders office for this 10th year of the justice submit summit. thank you and i don't have a prepared speech. i do want to address some of these misconceptions. there is a bail reform and we are part of the reform. we are proud to say that we are part of our regulatory agency with the department of insurance to reestablish the industry. bu
and file wanted the future to earn their positions and they wanted them to commit to education and wanted them to commit to hard work and that where john comes in and insurances us and the citizens that we serve and these people are committed to hard work and committed to being knowledgeable about what is good about our city. we will represent mostly construction workers and build the buildings and sometimes we have a falling out with our friends in the environment and often times we find the common grountd and talking about the public sector workforce. i am proud of the people that we have been able to graduate and how we have been honest about the people who were not committed to doing the work for 30 years or so, and that was kind of the key, and earn these jobs and respect your duty and take care of this important business, my hope is that you will all take interest in this program moving forward that you will accept our invitation to come on down and that you will recognize that nikki, and teresa and romon and joan are the people that really put this program together and unlike most
are we going to bring housing and the education pieces bus the criminal justice efforts and health and human services with clinics and bring all the pieces together and transportation mayor we heard about this today. all the pieces are coming together when this fall 20 neighborhoods will bespectacled as promise zones. that will be the culmination of our effort to build on this credible model we're seeing happen before our eyes. the mission district is an inspiration. i can't thank you enough mr. mayor and louis the entire village to create what i see in front of me today. you are an inspiration and i'll go back to washington and talk to the president and make sure that this example lives up to the expectation because no child should grew up because of the zip code they were born in arrest thanks for hosting this today. let's take some questions >> questions? >> as you know we're not out of a housing authority sites and are you saying we should get away from the housing authority model and it's innovate truly a private-public partnership but a nonprofit partnership so this is not
theatre folks standing here we've got educational proomz programs. we're deeply involved with this neighborhood and we incubate a lot of newark. it's such a beautiful cathedral of a spates. in the another way for us to partner with the community. this this space we hope to produce newark and engage new and local and old after the. we hope to share this space. in the a neighborhood filled with arts. a lessons king and luggage store. we're privileged to be part of this community. we look across the street to the museum. thank you for being here today. we know we've got the art community here and scott wiener is a big supporter. thank you scott. it's been an amazing journey. we'll see a rich array ray the hope is it will be a way for k correction e it to acknowledge the education and training i training is an numerous part 3 will transform this city. i want to quickly acknowledge a lot of community arts based on organization that have helped us in this journey that were i want to thank john the director who helped us spearhead this and our amazing architects and plant consu
's educational about this facility. >> fire fly by artist ned con is an art installation which rises straight from the golden gate avenue sidewalk to the top of the building. >> the fire fly wall will be 5 by 5 polley carbon plates that will move with the wind and show a wave effect in the daytime. when those also swing back and forth and they hit the fulcrum, it will also set up an led light that will cover the fire fly. so, at nighttime people in another part of san francisco can see the side of our building and about 20 feet wide and 10 stories high will be a wall that will flickr on and off like fire flies at nighttime. it will be so energy efficient that if all those lights go on, it will be the equivalent of a 40 watt bulb. and also the new piece of artwork going all the way down the side of the building, which looks like this incredible wind ripples on a pond. and i thought, oh, my god, how incredible, how wonderful. >> inside the building we will have water walls in the main staircase, and the water will be dripping through the side of the wall. you'll be able to hear it, you'll be ab
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